You’re … so vain [about your vanity]

I know, corny title.  The song seemed appropriate though…painting this vanity was purely an action of vanity – with wonderful results.  Our vanity was perfectly functional but was extremely oak sitting next to a walnut-stained oak counter.  But, it fit great in the space and was made of actual wood, so we decided to keep it to save some $$ and test our counter making methods.  Here’s where we left off after tiling and painting the bathroom:

photo 3

See? Even the iPhone refused to take a good picture of it. I assume that all Apple products have good design skills programmed into them and refuse to take pictures of ugly things.

I opted to paint it white for a few reasons:

  1. The blue is the only accent color we need in there
  2. The kitchen cabinets, which are much higher quality than these, are also white.
  3. I already own Ben Moore Advance paint in Decorator White from painting baseboards.  The folks at Young House Love liked this white too.

Ben Moore Advance is a water-based alkyl (very specific word for organic chemistry group of carbon+hydrogen) enamel (in this context, vague word for hard) paint, which means that in dries hard, like nail polish, instead of latex-y like most wall paint.  Centsational Girl uses it for a lot of furniture refinishing, and if it is good enough for her, it is definitely good enough for me.  She has also used it for repainting several vanities.

There are a million tutorials on painting cabinets on the web.  I only read two of them (Centsational Girl and Young House Love), and I’m quite happy with how ours turned out.  Therefore, I believe this method must be quite forgiving!

1.  Unscrew hardware from cabinets.

2.  (Lesson #1) Realize that if you clean and reuse this hardware, which matches all of the stainless steel in the bathroom already, you don’t have to patch or redrill any holes or readjust any springs to get the doors to lay right since they are poorly-made doors.  Clean hardware with keyboard cleaner spray and isopropyl alcohol.  Clean the one drawer track that has 50 years of grit stuck in it the same way.

3.  Take doors and drawers outside and gently sand them with 100grit sandpaper because that it what I had.

4.  Gently sand cabinet, especially areas inside of cabinet that are damaged.  Wipe down with microfiber cloths (or tack cloths, if you have them).

5.  Tape around cabinet edges in bathroom and put paper down on floor.  Set up painting pyramids for doors and drawers.  What an excellent invention – thanks again, CG!

6.  Prime doors and drawers with primer. I used a foam roller for flat surfaces and a $0.77 paintbrush for places the roller couldn’t reach.

Lesson #2:  Most people like Zinsser Cover Stain primer, alcohol-based, but you can’t buy it in or ship to it California so it is probably pretty bad for us.  The BIN can says that it “Sticks to all surfaces” & “Seals knots”, so it sounded like a winner to me.  Plus, we already had it from painting closets!  One complaint is that it dries super fast, even faster if the surface underneath has some varnish on it.  This can leave brush strokes, even with a Purdy brush.  Also, it is pricey, smells strongly and it does not wash out of brushes with water.

ZIN_PR_BIN_L

I have also used Zinsser 1-2-3 primer, which also sticks to all surfaces, but does not claim to (or appear to) seal knots.  Can anyone else comment on a good alternative furniture primer that is legal in CA??

16f08d03-740f-47ef-9e7b-c5343b7733a8_10007.  Prime cabinet, inside and out with primer before the primer dries on your one-time-use brushes.

8.  Allow everything to dry

9.  With ~200 grit sand paper, lightly sand the primer to remove defects.  I also do not recommend leaving them outside on a covered porch because some crud can get stuck in the paint, but I didn’t have a better option.

10.  Paint cabinets.  For specifics, there are better people to tutor you than me!!  I used the Ben Moore Advance paint with a foam roller on flat surfaces and a purdy brush for corners.  Because I was doing white on white primer, 2 coats was enough.  But, our garage/house door came pre-primed with a beige primer and that took 4 thin coats to cover with the same paint and a foam roller.  This paint is thinner than latex paints.  Resist the urge to do thick coats because that will only end badly with runny paint – the advance is thinner than most latex paints.  I sanded lightly between coats because some small bubbles formed.

Lesson #3: In thin paints or polyacrylics, sometimes shaking them can cause bubbles in the paint leading to bubbles in the finish.  For this reason, stir sticks can be a better option.

11.  I think the key is to make sure you give it plenty of drying time, even days, before putting humpty dumpty back together again.

12. Put humpty dumpty back together.

photo (2)

You will also notice we got a new mirror.  This is just a basic white mirror that I ordered from Home Depot for about $50.  Not a thift store steal, but didn’t break the bank either.  Definitely much better than the original builder’s mirror or the little temporary one I put up:

photo 3

And in case you just joined, here’s the original before shot of the bathroom:

unnamed

I have one more post coming on the bathroom and tying it all together with some custom shelves.  In the meantime, please comment on the quality of furniture primers that are actually legal in all 50 states!  I am trying to refinish a table and chairs and don’t want to botch the primer.

Want to read more about our guest bathroom?  Check out the links below!

Tiling: parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Bathroom countertop and the dud

Painting the bathroom (They say the tortoise wins in the end, right?)

Hello world!  Happy new year!  With this delay, you probably thought that all of my tile fell off the wall and I completely gave up on the bathroom, not to mention the many other projects that await me.  In fact, the bathroom has been basically done since October, with the last pieces (shelves) taken care of in November.  I also did some landscaping and undertook yet another furniture refinishing project, but I digress.  Today’s topic is painting the bathroom, which took it from construction zone to almost-done.

The tiling was finished in early August, and Mark the contractor kindly came back and installed the shower fixtures in the nick of time for our friends from NYC to come and visit.  They got to use a freshly tiled shower in a completely hideous bathroom (imagine it with fixtures):

…at least there was a wall hanging…

Not as good as where this post is going:

photo 1

Paint’s done! Yay!  Curtain is from West Elm.

 

But still, that’s better than this original bathroom from last January:

unnamed

The next most ghastly thing to do, after installing a shower where there was none, was to paint the bathroom.  Masking off my fresh tile and the counter and the toilet without having plastic flapping around proved to be a pain in the butt.  Such a pain in the butt that I apparently did not take a picture.

Figuring that my tiling would be a bit rustic and I had a wooden countertop, I decided to theme this bathroom after a vintage Yosemite poster and even pick an object from which to pick a paint color.  Yosemite is quite possibly my favorite place on earth and appears in many places in our house.  This is the poster I liked, found at art.com:

yosemite poster

An aside on what this poster means: Camp Curry was (and is) basically a village in the park at the back of the valley with tons of campsites and tent cabins.  When the park opened, if you weren’t rich enough to stay in the luxurious Ahwahnee Hotel, you stayed in Camp Curry (named after the Curries, the couple who managed it).  The cliff you see behind it in the poster is Glacier Point, where there was another mountain house you could stay in (ironically: has since burned down).  In 1872, the keeper of that joint would put out his evening fire by kicking it over the edge of a cliff, right into a giant pine forest.  The campers below starting viewing it as an attraction to watch the fire fall off the cliff, and it remained a Yosemite practice until 1968 when the National Park Service put its hiking boot down and said no more.  (Read more.)

So, I admit a little scary that fire safety was that questionable, but it’s a cool piece of history.  I decided to paint the bathroom light blue (this was the last bucket of paint I bought before I got interested in whole house color schemes, like this method or this method), but I had a feeling that a dark green bathroom would be out of place and a bright orange bathroom would just be absurd – so I went for the blue of “Camp Curry”.  Our greenish wedding towels would also fit in well I thought.

Lesson #1: Yes, I frikkin’ learned it again: test the paint on the wall before you buy!  You see, this time I thought I had it figured out since I was just matching a poster.  I decided to try out Sherwin-Williams paint in Liquid Blue since they advertise mold/mildew-deterring paints and our old house didn’t come with bathroom fans (and I didn’t want to pay to add one in a guest bathroom).  I sprung for a quart of eggshell Emerald paint (answer to BM’s Aura) for the ceiling, this time going a shade lighter than the walls (instead of bright white) to test out this effect.  For the walls, I originally choose their Duration line because it was much cheaper. (Read the next lines really fast while I turn pink with embarrassment that no one but myself has caused….I’m choosing not to lie to give you, the reader, more confidence – you can’t possibly second guess yourself as much as I did!) Then I started putting it on the wall and it looked a whole shade lighter when wet.  I panicked.  The guy at the store offered to darken the paint a shade for free, so I took him up on the offer.  I put it on the wall.  I panicked again.  It was way-too-dark-neon-blue and the bathroom was claustrophobic.  I didn’t take a picture because I loathed the thought of revealing this publicly.  (At least I didn’t paint my garage doors pink, right, Dad?)  I crawled over to Home Depot in shame and bought Liquid Blue again (HD has all the famous brands’ colors in their computers) and slapped that on the walls, giving us this:

photo 1

This is pretty true to color on the left side of the photo.  You can also see our lovely Moen Caudwell fixtures.  The tile looks a little pinker than reality.

So, the color’s pretty cheerful (sky blue – like waking up in your Yosemite tent), but I think if I did it again (and I am not doing it again for a long while) I would’ve gone a little more teal to stay with the whole house color scheme or a little lighter so as not to shock sleepy guests!

 It may be ok to pick a color off of a thing to match the room to, but the house can end up looking like an easter egg if you tend to like very colorful things!  Fortunately, I can keep this in mind when I eventually repaint our hazelnut cream hallway and red office…oops.

Lesson#2: Of course, paintbrushes do not fit behind a toilet.  I am sure there is more than one way to deal with this, but I found that using an edger (which I did not like for actual edging) worked well.

edger

An edger from Home Depot. There’s a little fuzzy, washable pad that snaps into the other side.

 

Start at the bottom and work your way up, moving the edger back and forth behind the toilet by sliding it from hand to hand.  This way you don’t cover your arm in paint.  Probably a paint stick duct-taped to the back would do the trick nicely too.

Lesson #3: Painting your bathroom at night is a great reason to consider green energy.  The guest bathroom was the one room we hadn’t changed out the incandescent lightbulbs for LEDs or CFLs yet, and the plastic that I wrapped the fixture in sort of melted around the heat of the bulbs.  You’d think it wouldn’t take more than a PhD to figure this out, but apparently it does…  In case we forgot, that’s an awful lot of electrical energy getting wasted as heat.  I have since replaced the electricity-and-plastic-burning bulbs with CFLs.

I actually bought CFLs enclosed in globes, like these, which look just like regular lightbulbs (instead of funny curled up fluorescents).  These look great in the fixture, but do take 30-60 seconds to warm up completely to have full light.  I was surprised because this is the first time I have seen such significant delay.  My dad loved it when he visited: he said that when he got up in the dark to go to the bathroom it was great because it gave his eyes time to warm up to the light.  I find it minorly annoying since I’m impatient, but then I again, I’m also one of those people who type 33 seconds into the microwave because it’s faster than typing 3-0.  Anyway, once the bulb warms up, it looks great.

Lesson #4: I had more trouble with the SW Durable paint leaching under blue painters tape than Behr or Ben Moore Regal paint.  This paint seemed a bit thinner than these others.  Maybe this same property made it a bit more mold resistant?  Personal preference.  I’m not anti-SW though: The SW paint store has better hours, discounts, better brushes and a little sprayer thingy you can load any kind of paint into (not used for this project).

To check in after the paint job, we went from this:

No way around it.

To this:

photo 3

still more to go…

 

The vanity does not belong, the mirror is just in place so our guests could see themselves while I bought a new mirror and I ended up adding a few more features for convenience.  Stay tuned (or rather, tune back in):

Want to catch up?

Tiling: parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Bathroom countertop and the dud

 

Refinishing a pic-a-nic table

“I say there, Boo Boo, I am in the mood for a pic-a-nic … table!”  -paraphrasing Yogi Bear

Everyone does know who Yogi bear is, right?  If he and his little pal were to take a trip from Jellystone and visit our yard, they would find a nice space for dining with their stolen pic-a-nic baskets.  Here is the saga of sanding and refinishing (and selecting a finish) our picnic table.

When we bought our house, the former owners asked us if we would like to keep their picnic table.  It was purchased circa 1952 from gypsies for two cans of peaches, two cans of tomatoes and five dollars.  Considering its rich history, its perfect fit to our porch, and the fact that it is in good condition and will probably seat 12 people, keeping it was a no brainer.  It might have even been made of a giant redwood that wasn’t protected by government yet, so all the more reason to keep it in service.  We found ourselves eating there a lot while we were doing some renovation before moving into the house and we like have dinner out there when it is still light.

Image

Yes, that is our kitchen table sitting behind the picnic table.  It was hanging out on the porch during the kitchen renovation.  And, if I ever finish tiling our bathroom, I have plans for it too!

There are two benches, but you get the idea in the photo.  The surface was worse for wear and pretty dirty – but since the surface was so rough, we couldn’t get it clean either.  After going in this circle a couple times and forcing guests to eat at it, I decided it was high time to refinish it.  Besides, nobody needs a splinter in their tush either.

Once again, sanding was the first step of the refinishing process*.  After my sanding experience with the bathroom countertop, my goal was to only sand this project once.  I fired up my little plug-in hand sander and went to town.  The light area on the left in the photo below is sanded and the other area is unsanded.

photo 2 (2)

First lesson: I have this 1/4″ sheet Ryobi hand sander.  It comes with two surfaces: a foam meant to soften the blow of sand paper that is clipped on, and a hard plastic piece that is for sticking adhesive sand paper to – at least I think that is the point of the hard plastic.  I can tell you that you should NOT stick adhesive sand paper to the foam pad, because it will remove the foam, especially at the corners.  And then your hand sander will cut nice circular groves in the wood, even if you cover the exposed hard corners with painting tape.  Fortunately, you can replace this assembly (or almost anything else you can figure out how to break) for about $1.00 by buying the spare parts here.  The fix took me all of 5 minutes and led to much higher quality surfaces.

sander

See how everything is kind of orangey?  That’s this dust AFTER I shopvac’ed the whole thing.

Anyway, I digress.  When I started sanding this picnic table, I really had no idea what type of wood it was even made from.  After removing the first couple layers, I concluded that it was redwood.  It seems that not all approve of using power tools on redwood, but I had a lot of damage to erase and a lot of area to cover so I just sanded away.  I actually didn’t have any of the issues I read about online – once again, there is no right answer for home improvement.

Lesson #2: Soft wood is much softer than hardwood.  🙂  I sanded the oak bathroom countertop in the garage for one of the repeats and didn’t generate noticeable dust.  My wrath on this picnic table, however, left piles of dust all over the drive.  I actually had to shop vac the driveway after the top AND the bottom of each bench and the table.  My clothes were also pretty gross.  I definitely took off a good 1/16-1/8″ of wood and damage in practically no time at all, which could be why folks don’t use power tools on soft woods.

I always wear a respirator and safety glasses when sanding since dust masks don’t fit my face well and I don’t like to breathe wood dust (nor 50-year-old gypsy paint dust).  It is surprisingly not good for you, especially in the large doses that this project generated.  This is kind of funny in a way since we visited Redwood National Park the weekend before undertaking this project, which is full of decomposing redwood dust!

After sanding, quite a bit of this dust clung to the table.  I did not have tack cloth, plus there was a complete coating of dust so I think it would’ve been futile.  Instead, I hauled the stuff into the yard and hosed it down with a jet attachment.  Again, I’m quite sure that I violated the many Rules of Handling Soft Woods, but it was very fast and efficient.  I have noticed that logging companies hose down the piles of logs, presumably to prevent fires, so one dose of water can’t be that bad.  I then toweled down the pieces and let them dry overnight.  The furniture seemed no worse for wear afterward. Here is a before (right) and after (left):

photo 3 (2)

Lesson #3: Redwood discolors after sanding.  The difference in the photo above is a dead giveaway, but that is 50 years.  What surprised me is that the sanded surface actually discolored slightly after only the week between sanding and refinishing.  It wasn’t too noticeable so I just plowed forward, but I did make an effort to sand and refinish the other bench and the table on the same weekend.

Lesson #4: There are many types of finishes that one can apply to wood.  I’m not an expert by any means, but here are the options I considered (read more here):

  • Polyurethene – oil-based coating, hard finish that goes over the wood.  Protects from scratches, hardens by cross-linking polymers (which means an actual chemical reaction leading to hardening), nasty to deal with
  • Poly-acrylic – water-based coating, hard finish, dries quickly, required sanding between coats, protects from scratches, hardens by cross-linking polymers
  • “Varnish” – this word is a general name for clear coatings, but also means a specific finish based on resin dissolved in solvent.  It dries and hardens as the resin evaporates.
  • Shellac – similar to varnish, but the resin is specifically derived from a insect’s secretion
  • Drying wax – hard finish, ingredients seem to vary – maybe like a drying oil?
  • Drying oil – naturally derived oil, dries as reacts to oxygen.
  • “Exterior wood finish” – typically oil-based (above), soaks in (won’t peel off), semi-transparent stain colors or no colors, weathers a little and protects the wood.  I am not totally sure what falls into this category or how they all work, but think naturally-colored porches.  I have found one water-based version.

My goal for finishing the table was to give it a durable (remember Tilley, who has no idea what is and is not hers?  Everything in our home must be “durable”) and water-resistant finish.  The table is under a covered porch so it will not see rain, but it does see pollen and want to be able to wipe that off with a wet cloth.  The durability was also important since I don’t want to redo this project anytime soon.  Along the same lines, I did not want to apply more than 2 coats of my chosen finish; while I’m sure tung oil looks nice, I was not up for 12 coats with a month of dry time.

I also wanted to try out a finish that is environmentally friendly.  Water-based products have more environmentally friendly options (and you don’t have to deal with flammable, hard-to-clean oil-based products).  I have come across two options of water-based sealers through searching around the web.  The first, Safecoat Acrylaq,  I found out about here.  I couldn’t tell how well this would weather.  When I emailed the company, I expected that I would be staining this wood (didn’t know it was redwood yet).  They were very helpful but they actually recommended another of their products, WaterShield, for outdoor furniture.  I couldn’t find this product locally so I can’t comment on it.

Instead, I used the other option that I found, Polywhey ExteriorWood Finish by Vermont Naturals in Caspian Clear.  I also found it to be a good sign that Vermont Naturals had a picture of folks finishing a picnic table on their website!  This product I COULD find locally in a paint store, except I think their stock was out of date so my can looks like this:

photo 3

On the website, it is labeled “Exterior Wood Stain”, which is perhaps a bit confusing since stain is not usually clear.  I emailed Vermont Naturals to ask about the discrepancy and they assure me that it is the same product.  It is actually made from whey, a cheese-making by-product that is usually waste.  So, we get double environmental points for repurposing waste AND not harming the environment with toxic chemicals in a paint finish.  For this surface area, I used two quart cans completely.  I applied it with an angled Purdy paintbrush in the middle of the afternoon.  I mention the time of day because it was HOT in direct sunlight.  The finish dried quickly on the furniture but it also left my brush a little tacky, even after cleaning, since it was drying at the top while I was finishing.  I would recommend using this finish out of direct sunlight for the comfort of your paint brush.

The finish went on purple and even milky in some places, which was a little scary at the time.  After drying, it had a nice clear color.  The wood looked a little darker than right after sanding, but this is standard for clear finishes.

photo 2

The purplish tint only lasted about 10 minutes before drying away.

I liked this product.  It was quite easy to work with, did not smell at all (no respirator needed for terrible fumes!), dried quickly and left a nice coating.  More like an exterior porch finish than a polyurenthene, the polywhey soaked into the wood (that’s the “penetrating” part) and left a subtly shiny finish.  This particular finish is not supposed to be as “hard” as a polyurethene finish, but it is perfect for an unassuming, outdoor picnic table with a history.  As to appearance, the coating isn’t as reflective as the Minwax polyacrylic that I used on the bathroom countertop.  I did not sand between coats like I would’ve with the hard finish and had no issues.  In fact, this finish did not bubble at all.  The can says to wait 2-3 days for the second coat to dry before using, but we put a water glass down after 5 days and it left a ring 😦 .  I would recommend waiting a week to avoid any issues – water glasses do not leave marks anymore.  Spilled water even beads up, as advertised:

photo 2 (3)

Here’s the finished product:

photo 1 (3)

Much nicer than the before.  (The kitchen table moved back in and now there’s backerboard there…)  Here’s a direct before and after:

photo 1 (2)photo 1 (3)

*Want to read about my first experience refinishing and appreciate what is possibly the ugliest piece of re-finished furniture in the blogsphere?  Try here, here , here and finally here.  I’ve published every mistake I’ve made so you can get off scot-free.

Chalk one up for repurposing.

This is the story of how I made my own chalk paint, painted a (free, re-purposed) nightstand, learned a great secret for stenciling and finished it all up with wax.

It is not necessary to justify an end table purchase, but the piece of crud that showed up in our house deserves some explanation.  Our dearth of furniture became obvious after we moved into our house last November.  We actually had never owned an end table because our couches could both access the coffee table and since we moved literally every year for 7 years, end tables (especially those grad students could afford) were pretty much dead weight.  However, our new house has a rather long living room so only one couch can use the coffee table conveniently.  Plus, I have spent way too much time looking at blogs and I see that end tables help make a house feel homey.  And Tilley seems to chew the furniture less*.

Anyway, time to buy an end table.  I tried to take one step up from Ikea and bought this little number from a fairly large store online:

l08048

Lesson #1: Cheap furniture not from Ikea can actually be much, much worse than that form Ikea.  It doesn’t look so bad in the store’s photo does it?  [Because I’m not saying very nice things about this store I don’t want to name names.]  However, when it actually showed up, the white part was yellowish, creamy MDF and the top was veneer that was about 1/16″ thick.  The whole thing smelled worse than cheap Ikea furniture and wasn’t easy to assemble.  But, the worst part was that there was a 2 inch chip out of the front of the veneer and the stain was splattered all over the top.  I do not have a picture of this tragedy since I didn’t really expect much to be come of it.

Fortunately, the large store has a phone line that is manned 7 days a week and has an excellent return policy.  Phone call #1 basically went as follows:

Me: My thing arrived.  It’s messed up, as in blah blah blah.

Customer rep: Can you fix it or would you like another one?

Me: No, definitely not.  I don’t know how to fix veneer.  I don’t really need another one since this has been disheartening. [Read: because it is a piece of crud.]

Customer rep: Ok, that’s a bummer.  We will give you a full refund and send you a USPS label so you can send it back.  Just package it all back in the original box, then schedule a pick-up when you have the label.

Me: Great, thanks.

I guess they must do this a lot.  Anyway, after about 10 days, the label hadn’t arrived so I called the store back and asked.  It turns out they had already refunded my credit card and weren’t going to pay for me to ship it back.  The lady this time said, “Just donate it.”  Ok then.  So, to donate it, I had to put the thing together.  Next time I want to assemble furniture, I am going to Ikea.  It was much more logical and the crummy pressed wood doesn’t completely fall apart.  Eventually I got it together and queued up to donate, but then, I remembered that I knew someone who needed a nightstand.   And a car-themed gag nightstand would be a great gift for this person…but you can’t buy those so what better way to use this stupid thing than for a gag gift?!  I filled the gap in the veneer with wood filler, let it dry a day and evened it out with a sanding block.  This removed the as-received hill-billy styling of the piece after I got some paint on it.

I decided to try out chalk paint on it because I like flat finishes, as I learned from my last furniture painting attempt.  I understand that chalk paint can typically be used without sanding or priming, but since this was sketchy, smelly Chinese MDF, I opted to prime before painting.  Sanding wasn’t an option for this finish.  Off came the hardware and I primed the now-nightstand with Zinsser BIN primer, which I have been assured is an excellent odor blocker by a Kelly-Moore rep that I met in Home Depot.  A Benjamin Moore store employee also told me that it is a good bonding primer, meaning that it should stick to shiney stuff.  It is shellac based, so it needs special brush cleaner (or disposable brushes).  Truthfully, I haven’t seen anyone else on the internet use this stuff – they all seem to prefer the oil based.  I have yet to find out why since this seems pretty stuck when I tried rubbing or scratching or sanding it off.  I already had a can on hand and it also cleaned off my hands without mineral spirits, so that was appealing for me.

ZIN_PR_BIN_L

Painting the end table with primer was already a step up.  Again, no photos, but just imagine the ugly thin in the photo up there all white.  I primed everywhere, including the inside of the drawer.

Since this is a low-budget project, I refused to buy full-priced, hard to find chalk paint and decided to make my own after cruising the internet.  I found my favorite list of recipes here and went with a calcium carbonate option, but created my own recipe.  I had no trouble finding this on Amazon.  This site used a 2:1 Paint: Calcium: Carbonate, which I assume is by volume.  I never follow recipes and this seemed a little thick to me.  I opted for about 8 tablespoons of the calcium carbonate, then added just enough water to stir into a paste.  The total volume of this mixture was roughly 4 oz.  I then poured in 16 oz of Behr Premium Plus Flat Enamel in Polar Bear White and stirred with a mixer that attached to my drill – probably meant for cement.  This type of paint said acrylic, not latex, on the can which may be useful for making homemade chalk paint.  The paint was a nice consistency, fairly close to what actually came out of the can.  All in all, I was very pleased with this recipe.  It went on smooth, did not dry with brush strokes and covered the primer with a single coat.  I did opt for two coats on the top for durability.  After it dried, the paint felt chalky, but not loose.  I was not interested in sanding the edges.  Now picture a white nightstand.  The photo is coming below.

I was interested in putting a stencil on top of this car-themed nightstand.  This is the emblem found on first-generation Pontiac Firebirds:

firebird

Whether or not it is politically-correct today is NOT the point of this post.  Let it suffice to say that the recipient of this nightstand is a fan of the first-gen Firebird, so I had an appropriate stencil made here on Etsy.  I was using previously-owned Martha Stewart metallic paint in Thundercloud, which may or may not be good paint for stenciling.

Lesson #2 (very important): Not all sponges for stenciling are created equal.  Typically one dunks the sponge in the paint, then blots off the excess paint until the sponge is basically dry.  I first tried a piece of just a plain old sponge, but couldn’t get it dry enough to not leave bubbles without making it so dry that it would not leave paint at all!  So, I drove over to Michaels and bought something like these.  These worked just as badly as the plain ol’ sponge!  But, I decided to plow ahead with too much paint on my brush…and got this mess:

photo 1

All of the bumps are because of the bubbles that formed in the brush.  The edges were also pretty far from clean since the paint leaked over.  I still had to do two coats to eliminate actual holes form the bubbles and so the whole Firebird logo was raised off of the nightstand.  Technically, it got the job done, but it bugged me.  Surely, there is a better way to do this!

I used my trusty friend the electric sander again and erased the Firebird from the top.  Then I put 2 coats of chalk paint back on.  The paint has kept perfectly for 2 weeks now in a plastic container with tight-fitting light (think large yogurt container).

Lesson #3: Makeup sponges make EXCELLENT stenciling applicators, especially when there is a lot of fine detail.  I actually learned that from here.  These are phenomenal and far and way better than anything else I tested.  Fortunately, I have a package of these for the foundation that I never wear.  The holes are so fine that the paint doesn’t bubble up and I could blot off the paint until they were dry, but still stencil paint with clean lines and no bubbles!  I end up going over the pattern 3 times to get the color to my liking.  Here she is:

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Lesson #4: Bleed through can be sort of cleaned up.  For those areas where I was impatient and didn’t blot of enough paint, there was still bleed through.  This was a particularly persnickety stencil since it had a lot of connected pieces, as you can tell.  It slipped around a lot and I was nervous about adhesive over my chalk paint.  If I did it again, I really now understand the importance of blotting FULLY EACH TIME no matter how annoying it is.

I used paste wax to seal the paint.  I used CeCe Caldwell‘s wax since it is all natural and I had to drive someplace special to get either this or Annie Sloan on the day that I wanted it.  I didn’t really want to pay for this for this project, but I have another project queued up that will benefit as well.

Lesson #5: Minwax paste wax in “natural” is not acceptable for white furniture.  I’m not the first to say this and I won’t be the last.  Fortunately, I tested it on the bottom just to see what would happen.  1) It was hard and didn’t blend well and 2) it was orange.  It is much much cheaper though, so I still would use it on a darker furniture item.

I painted the handle (spray Zinsser BIN and the Martha Stewart paint again) and screwed it back on.  Here is the whole thing in a room:

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Yikes, iPhone photos are not good for decorating photos.  Note my clever off-set positioning of the stencil so the lamp wasn’t smack in the middle of the stencil.

Fortunately, I already owned a lot of the supplies (and those which I did not are mostly reusable for other projects), otherwise this would have been quite expensive to dress up a free nightstand.

Anyway, the project was fun, the recipient is happy and I learned that homemade chalk paint is great and there are some tricks to stenciling.  The end table shall have a lovely new life as a nightstand!

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*This totally looks like a sane dog who doesn’t chew furniture, right?